Diane Exavier

writer | theatermaker | educator

Selected Plays

GoOD Blood

3W, 4M: The story of a Haitian family living in Brooklyn and their return to Haiti as they work to cure their history in the hopes of securing a future. From the journey of immigrants to the spread of a global epidemic, language, time, and an ocean are crossed in an investigation of the contracts we make, the conditions we live under, and what it means to reach for a love that might outlive you. 

A Big House

6-10W: A woman finds herself on a deserted island and is tasked with building a home, welcoming a few visitors to help her along the way. In a hybrid of poetry and drama, this woman fractures and tries to make herself whole again.

Cats for Change and Other Charitable Causes

2W, 8P: In this speedy nine part epic, a mother, a daughter, a turtle, a rabbit, and a bunch of cats do everything from win an election by making secret deals in a forest to plan a memorial service in Big Sky Country all in an attempt to challenge the legacies they've been born with while holding onto their family.

The Etiquette of Loss

2W, 2M: After her father Raven dies, Bird flies away and starts over in a new town. Now her sister Clay is visiting and ready to burn Ash to the ground. A father, two sisters, and a man move through time in an attempt to track what they've lost. 

The Analog Play

2W, 2M, 1P: In an exploration of intimacy during a sweltering digital age, a mother, daughter, and their respective partners negotiate the time, spaces, and terms of what may or may not be lasting connections in a brave-new-hot world that might just really be the same-old-lukewarm thing. 

Selected PUBLICATIONS

Books

Teaches of Peaches | TAR (available to order)

The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind | Fence Books (contributing essay)

Poems

On 100 | Solidarity Texts

The (Garden) Path to Place | Cunjuh Magazine (p58)

Counting (While Dr. TallBear Talks About Family Chosen and not Chosen) | Daughter Lit Mag

Fiction

Men and Women in the Town | The Atlas Review